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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Listen to the sound clip and fill in the missing words.

Chapters in books are usually given the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and so on. But I have to give my chapters prime numbers 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13 and so on because I like prime numbers.
This is how you work out what prime numbers are.
First, you write down all the positive numbers, in the world.
Then, you all the numbers that are of 2. Then you take away all the numbers that are multiples of . Then you take away all the numbers that are multiples of 4 and 5 and 6 and 7 and so on. The numbers that are are the prime numbers.
The for working out prime numbers is really simple, but no one has ever worked out a simple for telling a very big number is a prime number or what the next one will be. If a number is really, really big, it can take a years to whether it is a prime number.
Prime numbers are useful for writing and in America they are as "Military Material" and if you find one over 100 long you have to tell the CIA and they buy it off you for . But it would not be a very good way of making a .
Prime numbers are what is left when you have taken all the away. I think prime numbers are like . They are very but you could never work out the rules, even if you spent all your time thinking about them.





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