You are here: Main page  >  STUNT  >  STUNT  >  Chapter 2 (The Queen’s English)   >  For The Teacher  >  Texts  >  Musée des Beaux Arts  >  2: Teaching Tips
   
  Events that Made Britain
 
The Peoples of the United Kingdom
 
Youth Issues
 
The Media
 
Politics in the UK
 
English Literature
 
Listening Comprehension
 
For The Teacher
 

2: Teaching Tips


Drawing
Draw parts of the poem and relate it to the students’ lives.

This poem was inspired by one or more paintings by Pieter Breughel, one of the Old Masters. One way to get the students interested in the poem is to have them draw what they see in particular lines before they read the whole poem.
  • Divide the class into several groups or allow them to work individually
  • Give each group a section of lines from the poem (see instructions below)
    • lines 3-7
    • lines 10-12
    • lines 15-21
  • Have them draw their parts then place all the different scenes on the bulletin board.
  • After they have drawn their parts, read the poem. Can they now interpret it?
  • Are there situations like this that we experience in life?
    • Have they ever experienced a great joy or deep sorrow and wondered how the rest of the world can just go on with their daily routine?
  • This would be an excellent starting point for a new drawing or poem
  • Another poem to read in connection with this is “Funeral Blues” by Auden. You can find it here at Poemhunter.
  • Another absurd situation is played out in most kitchens most days when we eat our breakfast and read the news about someone else who has been murdered or a catastrophe that has occurred.

Instructions: Drawing parts of the poem – lines to be drawn in groups

1. While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:


2. Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer‘s horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.


3. …everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.


Note: These lines can of course be divided into smaller fragments so that each person/ group draws just one scene:


1. While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;

2. How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting


3. Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:

4. Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life

5. …and the torturer‘s horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

6. …the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone

7. … the expensive delicate ship …



« Back